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Fall, Thy Name Is Comfort Food

Friday October 9th 2015
CultureFitnessFoodieHealthLocal GemSixty Colborne

Spring

With the end of summer comes a whole new colourful grab-bag of beautiful produce. So what’s in season? Everyone’s favourite, pumpkin of course, and there are so many ways, both sweet and savoury, that it can be used that don’t involve putting it in a latte. Fall is also the time to head to the market to get your hands on parsnips, grapes, sweet potatoes, brussels sprouts and a rainbow spectrum of beautiful apples. An easy way to showcase these beauties is by roasting them or blending them into a soup which keeps the focus on their fresh-from-the-market flavour.

This month we’re sharing an amazing, and quick soup from Love & Olive Oil that features parsnips, but give it a try with any of the above mentioned veggies in season now. For more depth in flavour, you can roast your veg before blending. Want to cut out the dairy? Try coconut milk—it’s rich, creamy texture is a good substitute for heavy cream and the coconut flavour won’t overpower the parsnip. So grab some fall veg and get to blending!

Have you meaning to brush up on your cooking skills, or perhaps pick up a new one? The St. Lawrence Market hosts an array of cooking classes and talks for everyone from the beginner to accomplished chef. Classes fill up quickly so sign up early! Here’s what’s still available and coming up this fall:

Macaron-Making Class- October 30
Evening at the Market – November 12
Victorian ‘Stir-Up’ Tea & Talk

Ingredients:

3 garlic heads, tops cut off to reveal cloves

1/4 cup olive oil

2 tablespoons butter

1 onion, finely chopped

6 cups vegetable (or chicken) stock

6 large parsnips (about 2 1/2 pounds), cores removed, coarsely chopped

1 cup heavy cream

2 tablespoons lemon juice, or to taste

Sage Lemon Butter:

6 tablespoons (3/4 stick) cold butter, coarsely chopped

1/4 cup (loosely packed) sage leaves

2 tablespoons lemon juice (from 1 large lemon)

 

Directions:

1)     Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. Place garlic on a large square of foil, drizzle with a tablespoon of olive oil and wrap to enclose. Place on a baking sheet and roast until soft, about 30 to 35 minutes. Let cool. When cool enough to handle, squeeze garlic cloves from skin and set aside. Discard skins.

2)     Meanwhile, heat butter and remaining 3 tablespoons olive oil in a large saucepan over medium heat; add onion and stir until translucent, about 6 to 8 minutes. Add stock and parsnip pieces and bring to a boil; cover and simmer until parsnip is very tender, about 45 minutes to 1 hour.

3)     Add garlic cloves and cream and purée with a hand-held blender, or in batches in a countertop blender (be cautious blending hot liquids). When smooth, return to saucepan and season to taste with sea salt, freshly ground pepper and lemon juice; keep warm.

4)     Meanwhile, heat butter in a frying pan over medium heat until foamy. Add sage leaves and fry until crisp (about 1 to 2 minutes ), then transfer with a slotted spoon to a paper-towel plate lined plate. Add lemon juice to pan with butter and remove from heat.

5)     Divide soup among bowls, and serve topped with crisp sage leaves and a drizzle of lemon butter.

 

 

 

 

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